How to Cook Steak – like a chef!

How to Cook Steak – like a chef!

How to Cook Steak – like a chef! – Here’s how to cook steak like a chef – pan seared and basted with garlic thyme butter! It’s dramatic, simple cooking at its best, you’ll look like a total pro and feel like you’re dining at the best steakhouse in town…..

This is a reader-favourite recipe included by popular demand in my debut cookbook “Dinner”!

 

How to cook steak – the cheffy way!

Today’s recipe is more of a technique than a recipe – but it’s one that all steak lovers should know because it’s easy, worthy of using on high quality steaks and also a way to really elevate economical steaks.

It’s as simple as this: while the steak is searing in the pan, throw in butter, garlic and thyme and baste continuously as the steak finishes cooking. The garlic-thyme infused butter does all sorts of wonderful things to the steak, seeping into the cracks and crevices, and adhering to the crust of the steak.

It’s pan seared steak made Outrageous – and that’s Outrageous with a capital “O”!

What you need

Here’s all you need:

  • Thickish cut steak – no more than 2.5cm/1″ thick, because we want to cook this entirely on the stove (thicker cuts need to be finished in the oven). Ideal steaks: boneless rib eye / scotch fillet, porterhouse / New York, T-bone. Grade: takes high quality steak over the top amazing, really elevates economical steak.
  • Butter, garlic and fresh thyme

Steak cooking tips!

  1. Bring to room temp! This makes an amazing difference to cooking through evenly rather than ending up with a thick overcooked band in order for the very centre to be cooked to your liking;
  2. Pat dry and season the steak generously with salt and pepper – this helps form that amazing crust we all know and love about great steaks;
  3. Get your skillet SMOKING HOT before putting the steak in – again, for the crust
  4. WARNING: The butter will sputter when you add the thyme, so stand back!
  5. Take the steak off the stove BEFORE your desired internal temperature (see chart below) because the internal temperature will continue to rise as it rests; and
  6. REST your steak for 5 to 10 minutes so it sucks its own juices back in and the fibres relax. This is a must-do step for any protein you cook hard and fast!

Read More : Grillhousecafesanmarcos.com

How to Cook Steak – like a chef!

 

I’ve just cooked one very large steak here because 2 was a squish in the medium size skillet I use for photography and video purposes. I use the same amount of butter whether making one or two steaks because you need a minimum amount to have enough to make it easy to spoon over the steak as it cooks.

What to serve with steak

If you’re after the full, luxury steakhouse experience, serve this steak with Béarnaise sauce, its mashed potato counterpart, Paris Mash, and a side of Garlic Sautéed Spinach.

For a low carb option, serve it with Creamy Mashed Cauliflower – you will be amazed how delicious this is with the help of some extra flavourings!!  And a few more options:

  • Crispy Smashed Potatoes – pictured! I’m a little mad about these – they’re crispy on the outside and fluffy on the inside;
  • Potato Dauphinoise – good make ahead option, and also if you’re serving a group of people;
  • Sweet Potato Stacks – something a little different!
  • Roasted Broccoli – this pairs really well with steak, plus you feel virtuous eating a load of broccoli with this rich buttery steak…
  • Brown Sugar Glazed Carrots or Sautéed Green Beans with Garlic (make this while the steak is resting)
  • Cauliflower Cheese – A British comfort food classic!
  • Fresh garden salad or steamed greens with French Vinaigrette or Italian Dressing

And for a really simple option, just steam a load of veggies and baby potatoes, then douse in the garlic butter left in the skillet. Pretty darn amazing!! – Nagi x


MORE STEAK OPTIONS

  • Steak with Chimichurri Sauce
  • Steak with Creamy Peppercorn Sauce
  • Beef Steak Marinade – this is an excellent option for good value steaks, adds juiciness and tenderises
  • Creamy Mushroom Sauce – excellent with steak!
  • Mushroom Gravy – Or another gravy option: Onion Gravy

 

How To Cook The Perfect Steak

How To Cook The Perfect Steak

How To Cook The Perfect Steak – It took me a long time to figure out how to cook the perfect steak, consistently well, every time.
I’ve served up many overcooked, chewy steaks in our early dating days! For something that seems so simple, there are lots of variables, which can be confusing!

Now I’ve got great steak cooking under my belt, I’ve come up a no-fail, step-by-step plan, covering each of those variables, so you can be confident in the kitchen to cook beautiful, juicy steak.

📋 What do we need?

  • Let’s start with the steak of course. I recommend a good quality thick (2-2.5cm cm thick) ribeye or sirloin steak with some fat running through it.
    • Ribeye tends to have a chunk of fat in the middle and some smaller veins of fat (see image above).
    • Sirloin just tends to just have the smaller veins of fat.
    • We’re going to concentrate on those cuts, but I’ve also got a note on cooking fillet steak in the notes section of the recipe card.
  • DON’T be scared of seeing fat on your steak – some of the fat renders down to help ensure a juicy steak. We also crisp up that fat when it’s in the pan. Fat is GOOD!
  • What you do need to look out for is gristle – these are streaks of chewy/rubbery cartillage, that aren’t broken down during cooking. You sometimes find gristle as little wriggle lines of of-white in the steak. A little bit (that you can cut out when eating) is fine, but any more than that makes it a far less enjoyable steak.
  • For cooking the steak, we also need a high smoke point oil (such as sunflower oil), plenty of salt and freshly ground black pepper, a little butter, and if you want to to add some extra flavour, a few cloves of garlic and some fresh thyme or rosemary sprigs.

🔪 How to cook steak

For a 2.5cm thick ribeye or sirloin, cooking to a MEDIUM level of doneness (more info further down the posts for different levels of doneness):

  1. After taking the steak out of the fridge to bring it too room temperature, we coat the steak in oil on both sides, then add plenty of salt and pepper on both sides of the steak too.
  2. Add the steak to a very hot pan – preferably cast iron.
  3. Cook for 4 minutes, turning EVRY MINUTE.
  4. During the last minute of cooking, add butter to the pan, plus a few lightly crushed, peeled garlic cloves and a couple of sprigs of thyme or rosemary. Baste the the steak with the butter during the last minute of cooking.
  5. Take out of the pan and leave to rest for at least 4-5 minutes before serving.
  6. If you like, you can serve with a delicious steak sauce (some ideas below), or top with some garlic butter.

👩‍🍳PRO TIPS For the Perfect Steak

Type of pan:
Use a heavy-based frying pan (such as a cast iron) or a griddle pan. The retain the heat well, so the pan won’t go too cold when you add the steak to the pan. Cast iron pan also evenly distribute the heat, so you’re less likely to get hot spots, leading to uneven cooking.

Overcrowding:
Cook no more than 2 steaks at a time. If the pan is over-crowded, the heat will be reduced, meaning any liquid that comes out of the steaks won’t be able to evaporate quickly enough, and they’ll end up boiling instead of frying. That means no beautiful char, and therefore a lot less flavour.

Read More : Grillhousecafesanmarcos.com

How To Cook The Perfect Steak

Oil the steak:
Oil the steak, not the pan – this is so you get a nice even covering on the steak. You don’t have to worry about the oil not being hot when it goes on the steak. Our pan is going to be so hot, the oil will heat up instantly. Use a flavourless oil with a high smoke point – such as sunflower oil.

Season well:
As well as the oil, we want to season the steak generously with salt and freshly ground pepper.
Some people say that seasoning with pepper before cooking will cause the pepper to become bitter, but I have never found that.
The key is to use freshly ground black pepper that’s a little bit coarse. Don’t use fine pepper powder – that is more likely to burn.
You can make the pepper very coarse if you prefer it that way (just bash the pepper in bag with a rolling pin). Personally, I use a pepper grinder, so it’s just a little bit coarse.
You may think you’re adding too much pepper to the steak, but the flavour of the pepper ‘cooks in’ to the steak as you’re frying it, so it won’t be overwhelmingly peppery.

Steak thickness:
I tend to look for steak that is around 2cm-2.5cm thick. Any thicker than that and you will have to adjust the cooking timings, and are at risk over overcooking the outside of the steak, whilst the middle remains undercooked.

Don’t go straight from the fridge!
Cooking a steak right from the fridge is a BIG no no.
We’re cooking the steak for a short amount of time to get that perfect outside char. We really don’t want the steak to still be cold in the middle when we get to the char stage.

Type of steak:
My recommendation in most cases is to go for ribeye or sirloin steak. Look for a steak with thin veins of fat running through it. This fat will render down during cooking, resulting in a tender, juicy steak.
Try to avoid steak that has a big vein of gristle through it. No one wants to bite into that.
Also, don’t be afraid if the steak has a lovely fat strip of fat on that outside. That fat will give the steak more flavour during cooking. You don’t have to eat it (but I always nibble on a little, because it’s rather tasty).
You can of course use other cuts of steak if you prefer, but they often need different cooking times and sometimes need finishing in the oven.
I have some info below (notes section of the recipe card) on cooking fillet steak – but that one can be trickier, as it’s a lot thicker and leaner than ribeye or sirloin.
Other types of steak include rump, T-bone, flat iron, Denver, skirt and flank. Let me know if you want to info on how to cook any of these cuts in the comments below.

Even cooking:
Rather than cook one side until it’s perfectly browned (which can take a few minutes), then cook the other side for less time (so the steak isn’t overcooked), turn the steak every minute. This will help to ensure even cooking and char on both sides.

Rest the steak:
A good rule of thumb is to rest the steak for at least as long as you cooked it. This will allow the fibres to relax, and you’re steak will be juicier and more tender for it.
Rest on a slightly warm plate or wooden board.

Cooking times (for a 2cm-2.5cm thick Sirloin or Ribeye)

(Turning the steak every minute)

  • Rare: 3 minutes total
  • Medium Rare: 4 minutes total
  • Medium Well: 5-6 minutes total
  • Well done: 8 minutes total

 

10 Best Types of Steak for Grilling

10 Best Types of Steak for Grilling

10 Best Types of Steak for Grilling – If there’s anyone who knows a thing or two about grilling steaks, it’s Ree Drummond and her husband Ladd. You’ll often find Ree in the kitchen prepping the marinade or the BBQ sides while her hubby gets ready to fire up the grill. (Talk about the ultimate duo!) “Any time Ladd has cooked for me, he has made steak,” Ree says, “He’ll take a saucepan out to the grill, melt butter, and brush it onto the steaks with salt and pepper. Doesn’t get any better!”

But what types of steak does The Pioneer Woman grill? For the juiciest, most drool-worthy steaks around, we’ve rounded up a list of the best steaks for grilling. As any grill master will tell you, different cuts of beef will give you different results in the end: If you want big, beefy flavor, look for steaks with more marbled fat (like rib-eyes); Leaner cuts on the other hand (like flank steak) are great for marinades or sauces as they tend to be more mild in flavor. While some of these steaks are great for celebrations like Father’s Day dinner or the 4th of July, others are simply perfect for a weeknight summer menu. In fact, whether you have a big budget to spend or you’re looking for some affordable options, this list includes options for all kinds of steak.

So before you head to the butcher, read on for our shopping tips (and a few helpful hints on how to season your steak), then grab your grilling tools and check out our best steak recipes!

Flat Iron

Flat iron steaks, sometimes known as top blade steaks, comes from the beef chuck (or cow shoulder). It’s a super tender and fattier cut which makes it ideal for grilling. You’ll always get a juicy steak with this cut of beef! The best part? It’s often more affordable than some other cuts of steak.

Cowboy Steak

A cowboy steak is essentially just an extra-thick, bone-in ribeye, but it stands out for the way that it’s butchered which is a method called “frenched.” The bone is exposed creating a look that’s supremely impressive and fit for a cowboy! Just like ribeyes, cowboy steaks are well marbled and super flavorful, but for a little extra flair, try our Cowboy Steak recipe with herbed ranch butter!

Chuck Eye

The affordable chuck eye steak comes from the shoulder bone area of the cow, specifically the area closest to the rib-eye—meaning chuck eye and rib-eye steaks have a similar marbled fattiness. In fact, chuck eye has been called the “poor man’s rib-eye”! Most chuck cuts have lots of connective tissue, which makes them best for stewing or braising, but the chuck eye steak is the exception: A blast of heat from the grill is all you need.

Read More : Grillhousecafesanmarcos.com

10 Best Types of Steak for Grilling

Filet Mignon (aka Beef Tenderloin)

This steak is so tender, you could slice it with a butter knife! It comes from the short loin of the animal, which doesn’t get much of a workout. The “tenderloin” is the whole cut in its roast form, and “filet mignon” is the tenderloin sliced into steaks. Though beloved for its tender chew, filet mignon isn’t known for having that big, beefy flavor—it doesn’t have the same fat marbling found in other flavorful cuts such as the rib-eye or strip steak. However, it’s the perfect candidate for sauces and other flavorful seasonings—and Ladd’s grilled tenderloin is the stuff of legends!

Flank (aka Bavette or London Broil)

This lean, inexpensive cut comes from the abdominal section of the cow, and it tends to run on the chewier side. However, flank steak is great for feeding a crowd, and it lends itself well to a good marinade. Be sure to thinly slice it against the grain to break down the chewy connective tissue.

Porterhouse

The king of all steaks, the porterhouse is a hefty cross-sectional cut that’s made up of both the tenderloin and the strip steak. It’s undeniably a special-occasion steak that’s full of flavor and made for the grill: Sear it over direct heat first, then move to indirect heat to finish cooking. Keep things simple when you season this prized (and pricey!) steak—you don’t want to hide its natural, beefy flavor.

Rib-Eye

This pricey cut is known for full-on flavor, thanks to the marbled fat running throughout. Its name says it all: Rib-eye steak comes from the rib area, and it’s often considered the “steak lovers’ cut.” Beyond a little salt and pepper, the rib-eye doesn’t need much to taste great, but Ree’s lemon-pepper grilled rib-eyes are delicious, too. Just keep an eye on the grill for flare-ups that may result as the fat melts and cooks off.

Skirt

Similar to flank steak, skirt steak is another flavorful, flat cut of beef that comes from the abdominal area of the steer (more specifically from the diaphragm). A marinade works wonders here, as does thinly slicing the grilled steak against the grain: This will sever any chewy connective tissues and make for a more tender bite.

Strip (aka New York Strip)

This steak is a prized part of the short loin, which is the area of the steer that produces the most expensive and most flavorful cuts. Known for its marbled fat and full, beefy flavor, the strip steak is a good example of how some steaks have more of a chew without being tough. This steak isn’t as tender as the filet mignon, but it has a nice firm bite and rich flavor. Simple seasoning and a quick, solid sear on both sides are all that’s really needed.

T-Bone

The T-bone steak is the little sibling to the bigger porterhouse steak. The same two steaks-in-one make up this cut, only it’s a smaller version overall. And the same rules apply: Keep the seasonings simple to let the flavor shine, and hit it with hot, direct heat before moving it over to indirect heat.

SHOP COOKWARE