How to Cook Steak – like a chef!

How to Cook Steak – like a chef!

How to Cook Steak – like a chef! – Here’s how to cook steak like a chef – pan seared and basted with garlic thyme butter! It’s dramatic, simple cooking at its best, you’ll look like a total pro and feel like you’re dining at the best steakhouse in town…..

This is a reader-favourite recipe included by popular demand in my debut cookbook “Dinner”!

 

How to cook steak – the cheffy way!

Today’s recipe is more of a technique than a recipe – but it’s one that all steak lovers should know because it’s easy, worthy of using on high quality steaks and also a way to really elevate economical steaks.

It’s as simple as this: while the steak is searing in the pan, throw in butter, garlic and thyme and baste continuously as the steak finishes cooking. The garlic-thyme infused butter does all sorts of wonderful things to the steak, seeping into the cracks and crevices, and adhering to the crust of the steak.

It’s pan seared steak made Outrageous – and that’s Outrageous with a capital “O”!

What you need

Here’s all you need:

  • Thickish cut steak – no more than 2.5cm/1″ thick, because we want to cook this entirely on the stove (thicker cuts need to be finished in the oven). Ideal steaks: boneless rib eye / scotch fillet, porterhouse / New York, T-bone. Grade: takes high quality steak over the top amazing, really elevates economical steak.
  • Butter, garlic and fresh thyme

Steak cooking tips!

  1. Bring to room temp! This makes an amazing difference to cooking through evenly rather than ending up with a thick overcooked band in order for the very centre to be cooked to your liking;
  2. Pat dry and season the steak generously with salt and pepper – this helps form that amazing crust we all know and love about great steaks;
  3. Get your skillet SMOKING HOT before putting the steak in – again, for the crust
  4. WARNING: The butter will sputter when you add the thyme, so stand back!
  5. Take the steak off the stove BEFORE your desired internal temperature (see chart below) because the internal temperature will continue to rise as it rests; and
  6. REST your steak for 5 to 10 minutes so it sucks its own juices back in and the fibres relax. This is a must-do step for any protein you cook hard and fast!

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How to Cook Steak – like a chef!

 

I’ve just cooked one very large steak here because 2 was a squish in the medium size skillet I use for photography and video purposes. I use the same amount of butter whether making one or two steaks because you need a minimum amount to have enough to make it easy to spoon over the steak as it cooks.

What to serve with steak

If you’re after the full, luxury steakhouse experience, serve this steak with Béarnaise sauce, its mashed potato counterpart, Paris Mash, and a side of Garlic Sautéed Spinach.

For a low carb option, serve it with Creamy Mashed Cauliflower – you will be amazed how delicious this is with the help of some extra flavourings!!  And a few more options:

  • Crispy Smashed Potatoes – pictured! I’m a little mad about these – they’re crispy on the outside and fluffy on the inside;
  • Potato Dauphinoise – good make ahead option, and also if you’re serving a group of people;
  • Sweet Potato Stacks – something a little different!
  • Roasted Broccoli – this pairs really well with steak, plus you feel virtuous eating a load of broccoli with this rich buttery steak…
  • Brown Sugar Glazed Carrots or Sautéed Green Beans with Garlic (make this while the steak is resting)
  • Cauliflower Cheese – A British comfort food classic!
  • Fresh garden salad or steamed greens with French Vinaigrette or Italian Dressing

And for a really simple option, just steam a load of veggies and baby potatoes, then douse in the garlic butter left in the skillet. Pretty darn amazing!! – Nagi x


MORE STEAK OPTIONS

  • Steak with Chimichurri Sauce
  • Steak with Creamy Peppercorn Sauce
  • Beef Steak Marinade – this is an excellent option for good value steaks, adds juiciness and tenderises
  • Creamy Mushroom Sauce – excellent with steak!
  • Mushroom Gravy – Or another gravy option: Onion Gravy

 

Perfectly Grilled Steak

Perfectly Grilled Steak

Directions

  1. About 20 minutes before grilling, remove the steaks from the refrigerator and let sit, covered, at room temperature.
  2. Heat your grill to high. Brush the steaks on both sides with oil and season liberally with salt and pepper. Place the steaks on the grill and cook until golden brown and slightly charred, 4 to 5 minutes. Turn the steaks over and continue to grill 3 to 5 minutes for medium-rare (an internal temperature of 135 degrees F), 5 to 7 minutes for medium (140 degrees F) or 8 to 10 minutes for medium-well (150 degrees F).
  3. Transfer the steaks to a cutting board or platter, tent loosely with foil and let rest 5 minutes before slicing.

Perfectly Grilled Steak – Perfect Grilled Steak with Herb Butter features a homemade steak seasoning and buttery herb finish. This easy sizzling grilled steak recipe is mouthwatering!

Ben and I were lounging on the deck after Lincoln went to bed a few nights ago, cold drinks in hand, enjoying the quiet summer evening when I suddenly realized that Father’s Day is this weekend! I’ve been waiting for some big summer kick off to happen, but without me noticing, it’s arrived along with a day to celebrate our dudes.

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Perfectly Grilled Steak

A craft from Lincoln is likely in the cards, plus a big, juicy steak. Perfect Grilled Steak with Herb Butter, to be specific!

Thick-cut steaks are rubbed with a generous layer of homemade steak seasoning then grilled and smothered with thick-cut compound herb butter, which is fancy talk for butter mixed with fresh herbs, garlic, and steak seasoning. You are going to want to put this butter on EVERYTHING!!

How Do you Grill the Perfect Steak?

The trick for perfect grilled steak is to create two heat zones on your grill – one side will be screaming hot with a high flame, while the second side will be unlit and cooler. Sear the steaks on the hot side to get a flavorful, golden brown crust and those coveted grill lines, then move them over to the cooler side to finish cooking all the way through. This creates a sizzling steak on the outside, and tender, buttery steak on the inside.

Pan-Seared, Butter-Basted Thick-Cut Steak Recipe

Pan-Seared, Butter-Basted Thick-Cut Steak Recipe

WHY THIS RECIPE WORKS

  • Using a larger, thicker steak (at least one and a half inches thick and weighing between 24 and 32 ounces) makes it easier to achieve good contrast between the crust on the outside and the tender meat within.
  • Basting it with butter both deepens the crust on the outside and helps the steak cook more quickly.
  • Contrary to popular belief, flipping your steak frequently will help it cook more evenly and gently and develop a great crust

Pan-Seared, Butter-Basted Thick-Cut Steak Recipe – Summers are made for the grill, but what’s a steak lover to do when the weather’s too cold and wet to light the suckers up? Just cook them indoors. Indeed, pan-seared steaks have several distinct advantages over grilled steaks—enough that there are times when given the two choices, I’ll choose pan-seared just for the sake of it. While grilling will get you a rapid-fire crust on your steak with all those delightfully crisp, on-the-verge-of-burnt bits and a good smoky flavor, I find that the even golden brown crust you can develop in a hot cast-iron pan really accentuates the flavor of the beef itself, letting it shine. On top of that, pan-searing affords you the opportunity to add your own flavorings in the form of aromatics.

Of course, you gotta know how to do it before you can git ‘er done.

How to Pan-Sear Steaks

When I’ve got plenty of time to kill, I occasionally employ a low-and-slow cooking method, such as sous vide, or perhaps the reverse sear method I developed at Cook’s Illustrated in which you start the steak in a very low oven and finish it off on the stovetop.

But you know what happens 99% of the time? I’ve got a steak, I want to get it on the table, and I don’t want to fuss with it. After all, a steak is a quick-cooking thing. The king of fast food, if you will. I don’t want to have to heat up a water bath or my oven, I don’t want to have to wait for hours. That means I want to do it start to finish on the stovetop. Luckily, this is very easy to do.

The TL/DR version: start with a good, thick, well-marbled steak. Season it well. Sear it in hot oil in cast iron, flipping as often as you’d like. Add butter and aromatics. Keep flipping and basting. Rest. Carve. DIG IN.

Read on for the long version.

What Steak Should I Use?

You can’t end up with a great cooked steak if you start with a crummy raw steak. For the record, we’re talking high-end steaks here—those are the tender ones cut from the loin of the cow that generally command the highest prices at the market.

There are four different high-end steaks that you should know and each one is a little different.

  • Ribeye, also known as a Delmonico or entrecôte, is my personal favorite. It comes with a large, tender eye of meat surrounded by a swath of fat and a cap that comes from the spinalis muscle. This cap is far and away the juiciest, most flavorful piece of meat that you’ll find on any steak. Some folks might find a ribeye to be a little too rich and fatty. Some folks may well be lacking joy in their life.
  • Strip, also known as New York Strip, Kansas City Strip, or contre-filet, is similar in texture to that central eye of meat in a ribeye steak. That’s because it comes from the exact same muscle, just a little further back down along the cow. People enjoy strip steak for its relatively tender texture and good amount of marbling (more on that in a minute).
  • Tenderloin, also known as filet mignon, is the most tender cut of meat on the cow. When cooked, it has a buttery, almost spoon-tender texture. But what it has in tenderness, it lacks in flavor. As a nearly unused muscle in the cow, the tenderloin generally has very little fat, and almost no flavor to speak of, despite its crazy price tag.
  • T-Bone, also known as Porterhouse when the tenderloin section is at least 1 1/2-inches wide, is simply a slice of rib with both the strip and the tenderloin still attached.

The Difference Between Prime And Choice

All beef that’s sold in the U.S. is graded by the United States Department of Agriculture on a scale according to its tenderness and degree of marbling. At the top of the heap is prime, which denotes an abundant degree of marbling in a cow under 42 months of age. Only about 2% of the beef sold in this country is designated prime, and most of that goes to restaurants, specialty butchers, and high-end supermarkets. Below that is choice, followed by select, which are the two grades you’ll find in most supermarkets.

The grades continue to go down all the way to canner, which generally comes from very old cows with little fat in their tough meat. Luckily for us, you won’t find that grade in stores. (It’s reserved for such savory applications as school lunches and dog food.)

While checking the grade is a quick and easy indicator of the quality of the meat, what you should really be checking for is the degree of marbling—that’s the interstitial fat that shows up in white spiderwebs throughout the meat.

Why, you might ask, is marbling important? Two reasons: moisture and flavor. As well-marbled meat cooks, the fat will slowly melt, adding juiciness built right into the meat. Non-marbled meat might have plenty of fat on the exterior, but it doesn’t enhance the steak in the same way. Sort of like the difference between drinking a glass of chocolate milk or drinking the milk then shooting the chocolate syrup.

Flavorwise, almost all of the compounds our tongues sense that give us the thought, “Ooh, that’s beefy,” are found in the fat. In fact, if you take the fat out of a piece of beef and replace it with lamb fat, it’ll taste like lamb. Want chicken-flavored beef? Cook lean beef in chicken fat.

If flavor is what you’re after, fat is your friend. Look for meat that’s got plenty of marbling.

Choose Thick Steaks

The thickness of a steak is not just about portion control. Without an adequately thick steak, it’s very difficult to get that contrast between exterior and interior that is so desirable. Thin steaks will tend to overcook before they can finish developing a nice crust, even over the hottest fire you can muster.

I try to get steaks that are at least an inch and a half thick, if not two inches. This does mean that each steak ends up weighing in at between 12 ounces and a pound—that’s big, even for someone with a big appetite for red meat. But remember this: It’s better to cook one large steak for every two people than to cook two smaller steaks. Learn how to share.

Dry-Aged vs Wet-Aged Meat

There are two types of aging. So-called wet-aged meat is meat that has been placed in a vacuum-sealed bag and allowed to rest for a few weeks (usually while in transit from packing plant to distributor to supermarket). A wet-aged steak shows some improvement over a standard non-aged steak in terms of tenderness—there are enzymes present in the meat that will break down tough connective tissue over time.

Dry-aged meat is meat that has been stored in a temperature and humidity-controlled room for anywhere from a week and up to 10 weeks or longer. During this time, three things happen:

  • Moisture loss. A dry-aged piece of beef can lose up to around 30% of its initial volume in water loss, which concentrates its flavor.
  • Tenderization occurs when enzymes naturally present in the meat act to break down some of the tougher muscle fibers.
  • Flavor change is probably the most relevant. Due to numerous reasons including enzymatic and bacterial action, properly dry-aged meat will develop deep nutty, cheesy aromas.

Whether you want dry-aged meat or not is a matter of personal choice. I personally love the funky, blue cheese notes of a very old dry-aged steak and am willing to shell out the extra 20 to 25% it costs. Others prefer the cleaner flavor of fresh beef.

Bone-In or Boneless?

Talk to most chefs and they’ll tell you that it’s always better to cook meat with the bone-in because it adds flavor. I’ve always been pretty skeptical of this one for a number of reasons. First of all, the exterior of a bone does not have much flavor in it at all—you have to dig down into the marrow to get at it (just ask my dogs). Secondly, meat muscle fibers are pretty tough customers when it comes to allowing molecules to move around within them.

If an overnight marinade can only penetrate meat by a few millimeters, it’s a fat chance that flavor from a relatively flavorless bone is going to make much difference.

Indeed, I have tested this with prime rib roasts. One I roasted bone-in, another I removed the bone and tied it back on, a third I removed the bone and tied it back on with a layer of aluminum foil in between (to completely prevent any potential transfer of flavor), and the fourth I roasted boneless.

All three of the roasts with bones attached in some way were indistinguishable from each other in both texture and flavor, so there’s that myth smashed for ya. On the other hand, the boneless roast did come out a little dryer in the specific region where the bone was missing. Really, a bone accomplishes two things: It prevents some moisture loss by reducing the surface area of a steak, and it keeps that section of the steak from overcooking by acting as an insulator. Ok, three things if you count looking-really-awesome as an accomplishment.

I personally still go with bone-in cuts when I have the option because I enjoy chewing the crispy bits of fat around the bone, but don’t let anyone force you to do it if you aren’t interested.

With pan-seared steaks, bones pose another problem. As the meat heats, it contracts a bit, so while the meat of a raw, cut steak may be flush with the bone, as soon as you start cooking it, it shrinks away, causing the bone to protrude. This, in turn, elevates the meat from the pan, making it difficult to brown the areas of meat directly around the bone.

But there is a solution to this: basting. That is, pouring hot fat over the meat as it cooks. We’ll get back to that in a moment.

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Pan-Seared, Butter-Basted Thick-Cut Steak Recipe

Tips For Pan-Seared Steak

Salt it Well

Should you salt your meat right before cooking, well before cooking, or how about after cooking? This is another point of contention amongst home cooks and chefs alike, and one of the ones for which steakhouse-methods often get cited as evidence. At (most) steakhouses, they salt the steak right before throwing it on the grill or under the broiler, so that must be the best way to do it at home, right?

Well, consider that at a steakhouse, when a customer places an order for that giant côte du bouef, It’s gonna take a minimum of 20 minutes to get it to medium rare in the very center. That’s a lot of minutes in waiting-at-a-restaurant-for-your-food-to-come time. They salt right before cooking because they don’t have the time to let the meat sit after salting.

Truth of the matter is that you should salt your meat at least 40 minutes before it hits the pan. When the salt first hits a steak, it sits on the surface. Through the process of osmosis, it’ll slowly draw liquid out of the meat, which you’ll see pool up in little droplets. As those droplets grow, the salt will dissolve in the meat juice, forming a concentrated brine. At this stage in the game—about 25 to 30 minutes in—your steak is in the absolute worst shape possible for searing. That moisture will evaporate right off, leaving you with a tough, stringy crust.

Give it a bit more time, and eventually that brine will begin to break down some of the muscle tissue in the meat, allowing the juices to be re-absorbed, and taking the salt right along with it.

What does this lead to? Meat that is both better seasoned and more tender and moist when you cook it.

All that said, you will not be destroying anything delicious if you choose to salt your meat straight out of the fridge and into the pan.

Personally, I season my steaks at least a few days in advance, to give the salt maximum time to work its way into the meat. Why steakhouses don’t do this is a mystery to me.

And remember: USE KOSHER SALT, not regular table salt. The larger grains of kosher salt (which should more accurately be called “koshering salt,” as salt itself is always kosher and kosher salt is coarse salt used in the koshering process) are easier to sprinkle evenly with your fingers, and will also draw more initial moisture out of the meat to dissolve than table salt.

You may have heard that it’s a good idea to let your steak rest at room temperature before you sear it. Here’s the truth: don’t bother. A thick cut steak takes a long time to rise in temperature. After half an hour sitting on a plate in the kitchen, the internal temperature of my test models only rose by about 4°F (2°C). Even after an hour, they’d barely risen 9°F (4.5°C), not much of a difference. Cooked side-by-side against one straight from the fridge, the cooking time and eating qualities were nearly identical.

So while it won’t hurt you to let your steak sit at room temperature, you’re not really doing yourself any favors (despite what a certain very angry chef may tell you).

Use A Cast Iron Pan

A good cast iron pan is thick, heavy, and designed to hold on to heat for a long, long time. Once properly pre-heated (that is, smoking hot), a good cast iron pan will practically sear a steak on its own, even if you lift it off its heat source. This fact is critical for the fast searing that is essential if you want to build a thick brown crust without overcooking the interior.

Start in Oil, Add Butter Later

What’s the best medium to sear in? Butter, or oil? Some claim that a mixture of both is best, often using the excuse that butter alone has too low a smoke point—it begins to burn and turn black at temperature too low to properly sear meat in. Somehow, cutting the butter with a bit of oil is supposed to raise this smoke point. Unfortunately, that’s not true. It’s because when we say that “butter is burnt,” we’re not really talking about the butter as a whole—we’re talking specifically about the milk proteins in butter, the little white specks you see when you melt it. It’s these milk proteins that burn when you get them too hot, and believe me, they couldn’t care less whether they’re being cooked in butterfat or in oil. Either way, they burn.

What all this means is that the best cooking medium for a steak is actually plain old oil. And make sure to use plenty of it so that your steak cooks nice and evenly. I like to use at least a quarter cup in a 12-inch skillet.

Adding butter to the pan a few minutes before it’s done cooking is a fine idea. This is just enough time to allow the buttery flavor and texture (butter is creamier tasting than oil because it has a higher percentage of saturated fat) to coat the meat, but not so long that it will burn excessively and produce acrid undertones.

Because it adds proteins to the mix, butter is a better medium for adding deep brown color to your steak as well, which means that even if your steak is looking a little pale after its initial sear, once you add that butter, it’ll rapidly take on color.

Flip Often

If there’s one piece of steak-grilling advice that people seem to get more persnickety about than anything, it’s that your steak should only be flipped once.

False. This is another hang-on gleaned from steakhouses in which it’s simply impractical for a cook to flip more than once given the number of steaks they have cooking on a grill at the same time. At home, you’re probably only cooking a few steaks at a time, and it’s ok—indeed, it’s better—to flip your steaks more often.

You don’t have to take my word for it either. Famed food scientist and author Harold McGee has been advocating this method for years (and has the data to prove its efficacy). Dave Arnold over at Cooking Issues has replicated his tests, as have I (with hamburgers). You can quite easily do the test for yourself.

By flipping a steak multiple times—as often as once every 15 seconds or so—you not only end up with meat that’s more evenly cooked, you also cut down on your cook time by as much as a third, and develop a great crust on top of that. This is because with multiple flips, neither side is exposed to intense heat for too long, nor does it lose much heat to the relatively cool air above. It’s the equivalent of cooking it from both directions simultaneously.

That said, the difference in the end result is not too pronounced, so if you want to leave the steak alone and enjoy your beer, or if you feel the need to placate that annoying uncle who gets visibly angered by multi-flippers, go ahead and use the one-flip method—it won’t destroy your steak.

Similarly, using a fork to lift and flip will absolutely not destroy it. To hear people balk at the fork-flippers, you’d think that a steak is something like a water balloon, ready to shed all its moisture from a single puncture. This is not how a steak behaves. Rather than a balloon filled with liquid, a steak is actually a series of many many thousands of long, skinny balloons filled with liquid. Puncturing a single one will have no effect on its neighbor, and the amount of juice contained in a fork-poke-ful of punctures is small enough not to be noticed.

Still, I find it easier to turn steaks with a combination of spatula-and-tong or spoon-and-tong.

Baste with Butter

Basting is the real key to a perfect pan-seared steak. It performs two different functions.

When Ed walked by the kitchen in the office the other day and saw the big fat steak I was about to cook, his first question after hearing I was planning on cooking it stovetop was, “Isn’t it going to burn before the inside cooks?”

And the answer is yes—IF you cook it the traditional one-flip, no-baste way, that is. See, the problem, as Ed pointed out, is that with a screaming hot skillet, you end up overcooking the outside to a black crisp before the center has had a chance to even warm up.

A combination of flipping and basting—that is, spooning hot fat over your meat—will help cook it more gently, and more importantly, from both sides simultaneously, drastically cutting down on its cooking time. A basted and flipped steak will hit its appropriate internal temperature a good 35% faster than a single-flip, no-baste steak. How’s that for fast food?

Basting also performs one more important function: It’s a perfect way to perform touch-up jobs on your crust. Remember those pale spots that appear around the bones when you try and sear a bone-in steak? Spoon hot melted butter over them, and they’ll quickly color in.

The easiest way to baste is to tilt your pan slightly so that hot butter collects near the handle, then use a spoon to pour it over the top of the steak.

Did I say that that’s all basting does? There’s one more function: distributing flavor from your aromatics. After the butter is melted, I add a handful of herbs such as thyme or rosemary, along with some sweet alliums like shallots or garlic. They pop and sputter, releasing their aromas and rapidly infusing the fat with their flavor. When you baste, you’re adding that aroma with each spoonful.

Use A Thermometer

I can’t possibly emphasize this one enough. Use a thermometer! Use a thermometer! USE A THERMOMETER!

Yes, you may look a bit less macho when you whip out a nifty Thermapen from your back pocket, swing out the slender probe and insert it gently into the very center of your steak to register a reading, but believe me: Perfectly cooked meat will earn you more praise and appreciation than macho posturing any day of the week.

I like my steaks at around 130°F (54°C)—the medium-rare point. Many folks like their steaks rare, but to me, that’s a waste of a good, well-marbled cut of beef. You want your fat to be warm enough that it starts melting a bit, lubricating your meat and adding flavor and juice to every bite. With meat that’s too rare, the fat remains solid. You end up with all the calories and not nearly as much flavor.

On the opposite end of the spectrum with medium-well to well-done meat, not only have the juices been squeezed dry like water from a sponge, but the liquefied fat has already bought itself a one-way ticket to the bottom of your grill.

Remember: Thick steaks will continue to rise in temperature after you pull them off of the grill. Heat from the exterior layers will travel in as your steak rests. Make sure to pull it off the grill a good five degrees before you reach your final target.

But what if I don’t have a thermometer?

I get it. Thermapens are pretty expensive. With the amount of use mine gets (pretty much every time I cook), it’s worth the price. There are also now more affordable options on the market that do almost as good of a job. But what if you’re stuck in the woods with no thermometer in hand? Is there anything you can do?

Yes: Just go ahead and cut the sucker open to take a peek.

Garlic Butter Steak

Garlic Butter Steak

Garlic Butter Steak – This steak is the ultimate indulgence for any meat lover out there! The tender and juicy steak is seared to perfection and bathed in a rich garlic butter sauce, which adds a depth of flavor that’s out of this world. Serve it alongside some crispy roasted veggies or a mound of mashed potatoes for a meal that’s fit for a king (or queen)!

Garlic Butter Steak

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 200°F (95°C). Set a wire rack on top of a rimmed baking sheet.
  2. Generously season the steak on all sides with salt and pepper.
  3. Transfer the steak to the wire rack, then bake for 45–60 minutes, until the internal temperature reaches about 125°F (51°C) for medium-rare, or your desired doneness.
  4. Heat the canola oil in a cast-iron skillet over high heat until smoking. (Do not use olive oil, as its smoke point is significantly lower than that of canola oil and will smoke before reaching the desired cooking temperature.)
  5. Sear the steak for 30 seconds on the first side, then flip. Add the butter, garlic, rosemary, and thyme and swirl around the pan. Place the garlic and herbs on top of the steak and baste the steak with the butter using a large spoon for about 30 seconds, then flip and baste the other side for about 15 seconds. Turn the steak on its side to render off any excess fat.
  6. Transfer the steak to a cutting board or wire rack to rest for about 10 minutes. (Slicing the steak before the resting period has finished will result in a lot of the juices leaking out, which may not be desirable.)
  7. Slice the steak into ½-inch (1-cm) strips, then fan out the slices and serve.
  8. Enjoy!

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