10 Best Types of Steak for Grilling

10 Best Types of Steak for Grilling

10 Best Types of Steak for Grilling – If there’s anyone who knows a thing or two about grilling steaks, it’s Ree Drummond and her husband Ladd. You’ll often find Ree in the kitchen prepping the marinade or the BBQ sides while her hubby gets ready to fire up the grill. (Talk about the ultimate duo!) “Any time Ladd has cooked for me, he has made steak,” Ree says, “He’ll take a saucepan out to the grill, melt butter, and brush it onto the steaks with salt and pepper. Doesn’t get any better!”

But what types of steak does The Pioneer Woman grill? For the juiciest, most drool-worthy steaks around, we’ve rounded up a list of the best steaks for grilling. As any grill master will tell you, different cuts of beef will give you different results in the end: If you want big, beefy flavor, look for steaks with more marbled fat (like rib-eyes); Leaner cuts on the other hand (like flank steak) are great for marinades or sauces as they tend to be more mild in flavor. While some of these steaks are great for celebrations like Father’s Day dinner or the 4th of July, others are simply perfect for a weeknight summer menu. In fact, whether you have a big budget to spend or you’re looking for some affordable options, this list includes options for all kinds of steak.

So before you head to the butcher, read on for our shopping tips (and a few helpful hints on how to season your steak), then grab your grilling tools and check out our best steak recipes!

Flat Iron

Flat iron steaks, sometimes known as top blade steaks, comes from the beef chuck (or cow shoulder). It’s a super tender and fattier cut which makes it ideal for grilling. You’ll always get a juicy steak with this cut of beef! The best part? It’s often more affordable than some other cuts of steak.

Cowboy Steak

A cowboy steak is essentially just an extra-thick, bone-in ribeye, but it stands out for the way that it’s butchered which is a method called “frenched.” The bone is exposed creating a look that’s supremely impressive and fit for a cowboy! Just like ribeyes, cowboy steaks are well marbled and super flavorful, but for a little extra flair, try our Cowboy Steak recipe with herbed ranch butter!

Chuck Eye

The affordable chuck eye steak comes from the shoulder bone area of the cow, specifically the area closest to the rib-eye—meaning chuck eye and rib-eye steaks have a similar marbled fattiness. In fact, chuck eye has been called the “poor man’s rib-eye”! Most chuck cuts have lots of connective tissue, which makes them best for stewing or braising, but the chuck eye steak is the exception: A blast of heat from the grill is all you need.

Read More : Grillhousecafesanmarcos.com

10 Best Types of Steak for Grilling

Filet Mignon (aka Beef Tenderloin)

This steak is so tender, you could slice it with a butter knife! It comes from the short loin of the animal, which doesn’t get much of a workout. The “tenderloin” is the whole cut in its roast form, and “filet mignon” is the tenderloin sliced into steaks. Though beloved for its tender chew, filet mignon isn’t known for having that big, beefy flavor—it doesn’t have the same fat marbling found in other flavorful cuts such as the rib-eye or strip steak. However, it’s the perfect candidate for sauces and other flavorful seasonings—and Ladd’s grilled tenderloin is the stuff of legends!

Flank (aka Bavette or London Broil)

This lean, inexpensive cut comes from the abdominal section of the cow, and it tends to run on the chewier side. However, flank steak is great for feeding a crowd, and it lends itself well to a good marinade. Be sure to thinly slice it against the grain to break down the chewy connective tissue.

Porterhouse

The king of all steaks, the porterhouse is a hefty cross-sectional cut that’s made up of both the tenderloin and the strip steak. It’s undeniably a special-occasion steak that’s full of flavor and made for the grill: Sear it over direct heat first, then move to indirect heat to finish cooking. Keep things simple when you season this prized (and pricey!) steak—you don’t want to hide its natural, beefy flavor.

Rib-Eye

This pricey cut is known for full-on flavor, thanks to the marbled fat running throughout. Its name says it all: Rib-eye steak comes from the rib area, and it’s often considered the “steak lovers’ cut.” Beyond a little salt and pepper, the rib-eye doesn’t need much to taste great, but Ree’s lemon-pepper grilled rib-eyes are delicious, too. Just keep an eye on the grill for flare-ups that may result as the fat melts and cooks off.

Skirt

Similar to flank steak, skirt steak is another flavorful, flat cut of beef that comes from the abdominal area of the steer (more specifically from the diaphragm). A marinade works wonders here, as does thinly slicing the grilled steak against the grain: This will sever any chewy connective tissues and make for a more tender bite.

Strip (aka New York Strip)

This steak is a prized part of the short loin, which is the area of the steer that produces the most expensive and most flavorful cuts. Known for its marbled fat and full, beefy flavor, the strip steak is a good example of how some steaks have more of a chew without being tough. This steak isn’t as tender as the filet mignon, but it has a nice firm bite and rich flavor. Simple seasoning and a quick, solid sear on both sides are all that’s really needed.

T-Bone

The T-bone steak is the little sibling to the bigger porterhouse steak. The same two steaks-in-one make up this cut, only it’s a smaller version overall. And the same rules apply: Keep the seasonings simple to let the flavor shine, and hit it with hot, direct heat before moving it over to indirect heat.

SHOP COOKWARE

Pan Seared Steak + Steak Meal Prep Ideas

Pan Seared Steak + Steak Meal Prep Ideas

Pan Seared Steak + Steak Meal Prep Ideas – This Pan-Seared Steak has a garlic rosemary-infused butter that makes it taste steakhouse quality. You’ll be impressed at how easy it is to make the perfect steak – seared and caramelized on the outside, and so juicy inside.

Thank you to Beef. It’s What’s for Dinner. on behalf of the Beef Checkoff for sponsoring this garlic butter steak recipe. I received compensation, but all opinions are my own.

As everyone is staying home, working from home and homeschooling, people are cooking way more often and looking to improve their cooking skills. You all have been asking for more simple and delicious recipes that come together fast and have minimal ingredients. This steak recipe is so satisfying and will impress your entire family.

The BEST Pan-Seared Steak

This 20-minute recipe is done on the stovetop in one pan (no need to finish it in the oven). This is one of our favorite steak recipes and we make it year-round because it’s such a quick and convenient cooking method. That garlic butter is lip-smacking good! Read on for great tips on how to improve beef sustainability, reduce food waste and you will love our ideas for easy meal prep with leftover steak.

Ingredients for Garlic Butter Steak.

It really doesn’t get any easier than this and you don’t need much to make a lip-smacking good steak. We used 2 New York Strip Steaks (pictured below), each weighing 1 pound and 1 1/4″ thick. Keep in mind a thicker steak will take longer to cook through and a thinner steak will cook faster.

Well-marbled steaks will give you the juiciest results. Our favorite steaks to cook on a skillet are:

New York Steak
Top Sirloin Steak
Ribeye Steak

How to Pan Sear Steaks:

Pat dry – use paper towels to pat the steaks dry to get a perfect sear and reduce oil splatter.
Season generously – just before cooking steaks, sprinkle both sides liberally with salt and pepper.
Preheat the pan on medium and brush with oil. Using just 1/2 Tbsp oil reduces splatter.
Sear steaks – add steaks and sear each side 3-4 minutes until a brown crust has formed then use tongs to turn steaks on their sides and sear edges (1 min per edge).
Add butter and aromatics – melt in butter with quartered garlic cloves and rosemary sprigs. Tilt pan to spoon garlic butter over steaks and cook to your desired doneness (see chart below).
Remove steak and rest 10 minutes before slicing against the grain.

Steak Doneness Temperature Chart:

A steaks internal temperature continues to rise as it rests, so remove steaks from the pan about 5-10 degrees before reaching your desired doneness. Use this chart to determine steak doneness when testing with an instant-read thermometer. For example, if you desire a medium doneness steak, remove it from the pan at 145 degrees F and it should rise to 150-155˚F as it rests. The USDA recommends cooking steaks to at least 145 degrees. Read more beef safety tips here. Use the following steak temperature chart. These numbers reflect the final temperature after resting 10 minutes.

Medium Rare (soft, dark pink inside): 145 degrees F
Medium (soft, some pink inside): 160 degrees F
Well Done (very firm, no pink inside): 170 degrees F

Read More : Grillhousecafesanmarcos.com

Pan Seared Steak + Steak Meal Prep Ideas

What to Serve with Steaks:

Steak is so versatile but our favorite sides for making the perfect steak dinner are:

Roasted Asparagus or Roasted Brussels Sprouts
Creamy Mashed Potatoes
Oven-roasted Baby Red Potatoes.
Another classic steak pairing is Corn on the Cob.
Chimichurri Sauce is a quick way to add tons of flavor
Pro Tips for the Best Steak:
Preheat pan 5 minutes before adding steak for a great sear with good color and flavor.
Press steak down just as it hits the pan to ensure steak makes contact with the surface of the pan.
Loosely cover and rest steaks on a cutting board 10 minutes before slicing so they don’t dry out.
Don’t slice too thin, or the steak cools too quickly.
Slice steak against the grain and at an angle for a steakhouse presentation

How to Buy and Store Beef:

We love buying larger packages of beef, which are often a better value in price per pound. Once we have our meal plan for the week figured out, we refrigerate what we plan to cook within 3-4 days and freeze the rest. To preserve the quality of our steaks, we vacuum seal since air is the enemy of food. If you don’t have a vacuum sealer, you can also use a freezer-safe zip bag and squeeze out as much air as possible before freezing. To reduce waste, follow these guidelines:

Refrigerate Steaks (at 40˚F) for 3-4 days from purchase date
Freeze Steaks for 6-12 months*
Refrigerate or freeze right after purchasing
Place in freezer bags removing as much air as possible, or vacuum seal.

Steak Meal Prep:

Did you know 40% of all food brought home in America goes uneaten? Some of the things we do to reduce waste are to eat what we have in our kitchen and also to repurpose leftovers. Leftover steak is perfect for meal planning. Cooked beef can be refrigerated for 3-4 days or frozen 2-3 months. We love using leftover steak to meal prep Steak Cobb Salad in reusable to-go containers. Here are some more great ideas for using up leftover steak:

Dice or thinly slice cooked steak for tacos or Steak Fajitas
Whip up some easy Cheesesteak Quesadillas
Make a quick Philly Cheesesteak Sandwich
Love Beef? Visit Beef. It’s What’s for Dinner. for more great dinner inspiration and recipes.