Perfectly Grilled Steak

Perfectly Grilled Steak

Directions

  1. About 20 minutes before grilling, remove the steaks from the refrigerator and let sit, covered, at room temperature.
  2. Heat your grill to high. Brush the steaks on both sides with oil and season liberally with salt and pepper. Place the steaks on the grill and cook until golden brown and slightly charred, 4 to 5 minutes. Turn the steaks over and continue to grill 3 to 5 minutes for medium-rare (an internal temperature of 135 degrees F), 5 to 7 minutes for medium (140 degrees F) or 8 to 10 minutes for medium-well (150 degrees F).
  3. Transfer the steaks to a cutting board or platter, tent loosely with foil and let rest 5 minutes before slicing.

Perfectly Grilled Steak – Perfect Grilled Steak with Herb Butter features a homemade steak seasoning and buttery herb finish. This easy sizzling grilled steak recipe is mouthwatering!

Ben and I were lounging on the deck after Lincoln went to bed a few nights ago, cold drinks in hand, enjoying the quiet summer evening when I suddenly realized that Father’s Day is this weekend! I’ve been waiting for some big summer kick off to happen, but without me noticing, it’s arrived along with a day to celebrate our dudes.

Read More : Grillhousecafesanmarcos.com

Perfectly Grilled Steak

A craft from Lincoln is likely in the cards, plus a big, juicy steak. Perfect Grilled Steak with Herb Butter, to be specific!

Thick-cut steaks are rubbed with a generous layer of homemade steak seasoning then grilled and smothered with thick-cut compound herb butter, which is fancy talk for butter mixed with fresh herbs, garlic, and steak seasoning. You are going to want to put this butter on EVERYTHING!!

How Do you Grill the Perfect Steak?

The trick for perfect grilled steak is to create two heat zones on your grill – one side will be screaming hot with a high flame, while the second side will be unlit and cooler. Sear the steaks on the hot side to get a flavorful, golden brown crust and those coveted grill lines, then move them over to the cooler side to finish cooking all the way through. This creates a sizzling steak on the outside, and tender, buttery steak on the inside.

How to Cook a Steak Like a Pro

How to Cook a Steak Like a Pro

How to Cook a Steak Like a Pro – A perfectly cooked steak doesn’t just happen. Chefs take years to learn the ins and outs of determining the right cut to use, how to season it, how long to cook it, and loads of other tricks to make sure each steak comes out perfectly, every time. Here’s what you need to know to cook the best steak at home.

Choose the right steak

“Finding the best product you can get your hands on is always the hardest part of cooking a great steak,” says Ryan Prentiss, former executive chef at Detroit’s Prime + Proper steakhouse. He starts by looking for a well-marbled steak. “Fat is flavor, so look for beef that is plump, bright red, and has the most marbling,” he says. “Marbling is the intramuscular fat present in high-quality beef that gives it a ‘marbled’ appearance. Grain-fed or grain-finished beef will have more marbling than a grass-fed beef.”

Next, consider an aged steak. “If you’re lucky enough to find a butcher that has dry-aged beef, I highly recommend trying anything aged from 15 to 30 days until you become acquainted with the flavor,” Prentiss says.

Joe Cervantez, executive chef at Pier 6 in San Leon, Texas, agrees, noting that steaks are best eaten at 23 to 28 days of aging. “Most steaks from the grocery store are aged 14 days,” he says. If you’re up for trying your hand at dry-aging, you can do it at home. Cervantez suggests that if you have access to a vacuum sealer, pack the meat in an airtight seal until it hits at least 23 days.

Then, pick the cut. Chef Dan Sharp of The Meatball Shop in New York City believes certain types of steak are better suited for grilling. He recommends a skirt steak for a hot grill, whereas a New York strip or rib eye steak is best for a cast-iron pan over a burner. For pan cooking, Sharp recommends a 3/4- to 1-inch steak because “the thickness gives you time to get a nice crust on the outside without overcooking the inside,” he says.

Embrace the family-size steak when cooking for a crowd

“Don’t be afraid to go with one large steak, like a 32-ounce rib-eye or a one-kilo porterhouse, for a group as opposed to multiple individual steaks,” says Prentiss. “One large steak is easier to manage and monitor on a grill than multiple smaller ones, and armed with a good thermometer, any cook can nail a perfect medium-rare every time.” Because of the inherent internal variation of cooking times within a steak, Prentiss says, you can accommodate diners who prefer medium rare and medium well with just one piece of meat.

Temper your steaks before cooking

Prentiss advises taking your steak out from the fridge about an hour before you cook it, and setting it on a roasting rack over a baking sheet to drain off the marinade or other liquid. (This is also the best time to season it with salt, ideally medium-grain sea salt, he says. More on that below.)

Sharp prefers to season his steaks a couple of hours in advance, and agrees about letting them come to room temperature before cooking. There’s an exception to this rule, however: “If [the steak] is on the thinner side,” he says, “starting it cold will give a buffer from overcooking the center.”

Use the right kind of salt — and lots of it

Choosing between the myriad types of salt can be confusing, but these chefs have definite opinions on what to use and when. “True sea salt is always the way to go when seasoning a steak,” Prentiss says. “We use Jacobsen’s kosher salt from Portland, Oregon. The grains are medium-sized and their pleasant minerality lends itself perfectly to grilled beef. Any true fleur de sel or sel gris-type sea salt will work well for good beef. Avoid table salt, iodized salt, or fine-grain sea salts as they have more weight to volume than larger grain salts, and you can easily over-season with them. Just think medium grain, true sea salt.”

Cervantez is a fan of kosher salt, which is virtually identical to sea salt. He advocates also seasoning steaks with pepper, and recommends combining pepper with salt in equal quantities.

When you do season your steak, go a little overboard. “Always overseason your steaks a bit,” says Christian Ragano, executive chef at Cindy’s rooftop restaurant at the Chicago Athletic Association. “When you think it’s enough, add a little more. A lot of salt and pepper falls off during the cooking process and doesn’t always penetrate the meat.”

Dinesh Jayawardena, regional executive chef for Radisson Hotel Group Americas, concurs, noting that salt is, “the most important ingredient you could ever add to a steak. Now is not the time to be shy about seasoning,” he says. “Do this before you let the steaks rest so the seasoning has time to work its way deep into the meat.”

How to Cook a Steak Like a Pro

Take steps to ensure a good crust

Before placing your steak on the grill, make sure there is no moisture on the surface of the meat. “Pat down your meat,” says Cervantez. “Dry meat forms the best crust.”

Juan Carlos Gonzalez, former executive chef of SoBou in New Orleans, likes to add a bit of olive oil as well, which he says helps achieve a better sear or griddle marks. If you do decide to add some fat, stick with olive oil, not butter, says Angelo Auriana, executive chef at Factory Place Hospitality. “There is no real need for butter when cooking a steak because it already has plenty of fat and flavor in the meat itself,” he says. (That is, of course, assuming you have a solid starting product.)

Set up your grill with hardwood (and skip the lighter fluid)

The best way to go, however, is hardwood or hardwood lump charcoal. “Natural solid fuels add the most flavor to steaks, complementing their natural flavors instead of overpowering them,” says Prentiss. “At P+P we [used] seasoned oak logs and a hardwood lump charcoal made from mesquite. This yields a consistent fire with minimal smoke that burns around 800°F.

“Always avoid lighter fluid if possible, and while convenient, charcoal briquettes can add an unpleasant kerosene flavor to grilled meats and should be avoided,” he continues. “If a wood/natural lump charcoal fire is unavailable or too inconvenient, propane grills will ultimately yield a better steak than charcoal briquettes and lighter fluid.”

Start with a super hot grill

“Be sure to let your charcoal fully catch and heat up before attempting to grill on it, about 20 to 30 minutes,” says Prentiss. “Your fire should have a bed of red-hot coals, [with] high, even heat across the grill, and minimal flames and smoke.”

“A hot cooking surface is extremely important to caramelize the outside of the steak and secure in the flavor,” says Jayawardena. “This method will give you a steak that is crispy on the outside, yet moist and tender inside.”

Use a meat thermometer — even if you’re a pro

That’s right — Ragano asserts this is one of the most important things to remember. “Temping a steak by hand can be tricky,” he says. “It takes a ton of practice and a ton of experience. Thomas Keller once said, ‘You have to cook a steak a thousand times just to suck at it.'”

Here are cooking temperature guidelines to keep in mind:

  • Rare (red center): 125°F to 130°F
  • Medium-rare (warm, dark pink center): 130°F to 135°F
  • Medium (warm, pink center): 140°F to 145°F
  • Medium-well (hot, slightly pink center): 150°F to 155°F
  • Well done (brown all the way through): 160°F to 165°F

Don’t have a meat thermometer on hand? Chef Ted Hopson recommends using metal cake testers. “People are always looking for secrets on how to get the perfect steak doneness,” he says. “Metal cake testers are the best tool you can use for this. Insert the metal tester into the steak, leave it for five seconds, then pull it out and touch it to your lips or inner wrist. The internal temp of the steak will tell you how done it is. If it’s cold, your steak is rare; if it’s just warm, medium-rare; slightly hot, medium, etc. No more pushing on it to test it — what happens when you hit a muscle knot? Plus, cake testers are less than a dollar and you can get them in baking sections or on Amazon.”

Don’t flip your steak more than once

“Keep away from overturning your steak,” says Eric Schlicht, chef at Ocean Resort Casino’s American Cut in Atlantic City, New Jersey. “Let the Maillard reaction do its thing.” Maillard reaction is the name of the chemical reaction between amino acids and sugars that yields browned and caramelized food.

Ideally, Prentiss says, you should turn the steak once on each side to get those crosshatch grill marks, and then only flip it once.

Let the steak rest

“Cooking the steak to 10 degrees below your desired temp and then resting it allows for the collagen in the meat to thicken the juices as it cools slightly,” says Prentiss. “This creates a way juicier steak than just cooking straight to temp.”

Sharp agrees. “Let it rest. This is crucial,” he says. “Just because the steak is out of the pan doesn’t mean it stopped cooking. Keep it in a warm place — you don’t want a cold steak — and rest it for about as long as you cooked it.”

Gonzalez suggests allowing the steak to rest for half the cooking time before serving. So if your steak takes 10 minutes to cook, let it rest for five. This is a good time to put out sauces you want to serve with your steak, and make sure your sides and table are ready.

If you’re not able to keep the steak warm while it rests, or you want to eat it quite hot, Prentiss advises returning the steak to the grill after it’s rested and bringing it up to the internal temperature of your preference before eating. Then, give it a final pinch of salt before you serve. “With larger steaks it’s always a good idea to finish with some large flake or finishing salt once it’s sliced,” says Prentiss. Then, it’s time to eat.

10 Best Types of Steak for Grilling

10 Best Types of Steak for Grilling

10 Best Types of Steak for Grilling – If there’s anyone who knows a thing or two about grilling steaks, it’s Ree Drummond and her husband Ladd. You’ll often find Ree in the kitchen prepping the marinade or the BBQ sides while her hubby gets ready to fire up the grill. (Talk about the ultimate duo!) “Any time Ladd has cooked for me, he has made steak,” Ree says, “He’ll take a saucepan out to the grill, melt butter, and brush it onto the steaks with salt and pepper. Doesn’t get any better!”

But what types of steak does The Pioneer Woman grill? For the juiciest, most drool-worthy steaks around, we’ve rounded up a list of the best steaks for grilling. As any grill master will tell you, different cuts of beef will give you different results in the end: If you want big, beefy flavor, look for steaks with more marbled fat (like rib-eyes); Leaner cuts on the other hand (like flank steak) are great for marinades or sauces as they tend to be more mild in flavor. While some of these steaks are great for celebrations like Father’s Day dinner or the 4th of July, others are simply perfect for a weeknight summer menu. In fact, whether you have a big budget to spend or you’re looking for some affordable options, this list includes options for all kinds of steak.

So before you head to the butcher, read on for our shopping tips (and a few helpful hints on how to season your steak), then grab your grilling tools and check out our best steak recipes!

Flat Iron

Flat iron steaks, sometimes known as top blade steaks, comes from the beef chuck (or cow shoulder). It’s a super tender and fattier cut which makes it ideal for grilling. You’ll always get a juicy steak with this cut of beef! The best part? It’s often more affordable than some other cuts of steak.

Cowboy Steak

A cowboy steak is essentially just an extra-thick, bone-in ribeye, but it stands out for the way that it’s butchered which is a method called “frenched.” The bone is exposed creating a look that’s supremely impressive and fit for a cowboy! Just like ribeyes, cowboy steaks are well marbled and super flavorful, but for a little extra flair, try our Cowboy Steak recipe with herbed ranch butter!

Chuck Eye

The affordable chuck eye steak comes from the shoulder bone area of the cow, specifically the area closest to the rib-eye—meaning chuck eye and rib-eye steaks have a similar marbled fattiness. In fact, chuck eye has been called the “poor man’s rib-eye”! Most chuck cuts have lots of connective tissue, which makes them best for stewing or braising, but the chuck eye steak is the exception: A blast of heat from the grill is all you need.

Read More : Grillhousecafesanmarcos.com

10 Best Types of Steak for Grilling

Filet Mignon (aka Beef Tenderloin)

This steak is so tender, you could slice it with a butter knife! It comes from the short loin of the animal, which doesn’t get much of a workout. The “tenderloin” is the whole cut in its roast form, and “filet mignon” is the tenderloin sliced into steaks. Though beloved for its tender chew, filet mignon isn’t known for having that big, beefy flavor—it doesn’t have the same fat marbling found in other flavorful cuts such as the rib-eye or strip steak. However, it’s the perfect candidate for sauces and other flavorful seasonings—and Ladd’s grilled tenderloin is the stuff of legends!

Flank (aka Bavette or London Broil)

This lean, inexpensive cut comes from the abdominal section of the cow, and it tends to run on the chewier side. However, flank steak is great for feeding a crowd, and it lends itself well to a good marinade. Be sure to thinly slice it against the grain to break down the chewy connective tissue.

Porterhouse

The king of all steaks, the porterhouse is a hefty cross-sectional cut that’s made up of both the tenderloin and the strip steak. It’s undeniably a special-occasion steak that’s full of flavor and made for the grill: Sear it over direct heat first, then move to indirect heat to finish cooking. Keep things simple when you season this prized (and pricey!) steak—you don’t want to hide its natural, beefy flavor.

Rib-Eye

This pricey cut is known for full-on flavor, thanks to the marbled fat running throughout. Its name says it all: Rib-eye steak comes from the rib area, and it’s often considered the “steak lovers’ cut.” Beyond a little salt and pepper, the rib-eye doesn’t need much to taste great, but Ree’s lemon-pepper grilled rib-eyes are delicious, too. Just keep an eye on the grill for flare-ups that may result as the fat melts and cooks off.

Skirt

Similar to flank steak, skirt steak is another flavorful, flat cut of beef that comes from the abdominal area of the steer (more specifically from the diaphragm). A marinade works wonders here, as does thinly slicing the grilled steak against the grain: This will sever any chewy connective tissues and make for a more tender bite.

Strip (aka New York Strip)

This steak is a prized part of the short loin, which is the area of the steer that produces the most expensive and most flavorful cuts. Known for its marbled fat and full, beefy flavor, the strip steak is a good example of how some steaks have more of a chew without being tough. This steak isn’t as tender as the filet mignon, but it has a nice firm bite and rich flavor. Simple seasoning and a quick, solid sear on both sides are all that’s really needed.

T-Bone

The T-bone steak is the little sibling to the bigger porterhouse steak. The same two steaks-in-one make up this cut, only it’s a smaller version overall. And the same rules apply: Keep the seasonings simple to let the flavor shine, and hit it with hot, direct heat before moving it over to indirect heat.

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