How to Cook Steak – like a chef!

How to Cook Steak – like a chef!

How to Cook Steak – like a chef! – Here’s how to cook steak like a chef – pan seared and basted with garlic thyme butter! It’s dramatic, simple cooking at its best, you’ll look like a total pro and feel like you’re dining at the best steakhouse in town…..

This is a reader-favourite recipe included by popular demand in my debut cookbook “Dinner”!

 

How to cook steak – the cheffy way!

Today’s recipe is more of a technique than a recipe – but it’s one that all steak lovers should know because it’s easy, worthy of using on high quality steaks and also a way to really elevate economical steaks.

It’s as simple as this: while the steak is searing in the pan, throw in butter, garlic and thyme and baste continuously as the steak finishes cooking. The garlic-thyme infused butter does all sorts of wonderful things to the steak, seeping into the cracks and crevices, and adhering to the crust of the steak.

It’s pan seared steak made Outrageous – and that’s Outrageous with a capital “O”!

What you need

Here’s all you need:

  • Thickish cut steak – no more than 2.5cm/1″ thick, because we want to cook this entirely on the stove (thicker cuts need to be finished in the oven). Ideal steaks: boneless rib eye / scotch fillet, porterhouse / New York, T-bone. Grade: takes high quality steak over the top amazing, really elevates economical steak.
  • Butter, garlic and fresh thyme

Steak cooking tips!

  1. Bring to room temp! This makes an amazing difference to cooking through evenly rather than ending up with a thick overcooked band in order for the very centre to be cooked to your liking;
  2. Pat dry and season the steak generously with salt and pepper – this helps form that amazing crust we all know and love about great steaks;
  3. Get your skillet SMOKING HOT before putting the steak in – again, for the crust
  4. WARNING: The butter will sputter when you add the thyme, so stand back!
  5. Take the steak off the stove BEFORE your desired internal temperature (see chart below) because the internal temperature will continue to rise as it rests; and
  6. REST your steak for 5 to 10 minutes so it sucks its own juices back in and the fibres relax. This is a must-do step for any protein you cook hard and fast!

Read More : Grillhousecafesanmarcos.com

How to Cook Steak – like a chef!

 

I’ve just cooked one very large steak here because 2 was a squish in the medium size skillet I use for photography and video purposes. I use the same amount of butter whether making one or two steaks because you need a minimum amount to have enough to make it easy to spoon over the steak as it cooks.

What to serve with steak

If you’re after the full, luxury steakhouse experience, serve this steak with Béarnaise sauce, its mashed potato counterpart, Paris Mash, and a side of Garlic Sautéed Spinach.

For a low carb option, serve it with Creamy Mashed Cauliflower – you will be amazed how delicious this is with the help of some extra flavourings!!  And a few more options:

  • Crispy Smashed Potatoes – pictured! I’m a little mad about these – they’re crispy on the outside and fluffy on the inside;
  • Potato Dauphinoise – good make ahead option, and also if you’re serving a group of people;
  • Sweet Potato Stacks – something a little different!
  • Roasted Broccoli – this pairs really well with steak, plus you feel virtuous eating a load of broccoli with this rich buttery steak…
  • Brown Sugar Glazed Carrots or Sautéed Green Beans with Garlic (make this while the steak is resting)
  • Cauliflower Cheese – A British comfort food classic!
  • Fresh garden salad or steamed greens with French Vinaigrette or Italian Dressing

And for a really simple option, just steam a load of veggies and baby potatoes, then douse in the garlic butter left in the skillet. Pretty darn amazing!! – Nagi x


MORE STEAK OPTIONS

  • Steak with Chimichurri Sauce
  • Steak with Creamy Peppercorn Sauce
  • Beef Steak Marinade – this is an excellent option for good value steaks, adds juiciness and tenderises
  • Creamy Mushroom Sauce – excellent with steak!
  • Mushroom Gravy – Or another gravy option: Onion Gravy

 

How to Cook Steak Perfectly Every Time

How to Cook Steak Perfectly Every Time

What are the different grades of beef?

How to Cook Steak Perfectly Every Time – There are three grades of beef steak that you will find in a US supermarket: Select, Choice, and Prime. Select is generally the grade of sale-priced, or advertised meat. Select grade is just above what the USDA deems edible. So if you buy Select grade meat, don’t be surprised when it isn’t that great. It will always be worth it to pay the extra money per pound for the Choice grade. If it is choice grade, it will be advertised as such and marked somewhere on the label or packaging. If your supermarket carries Prime grade, lucky you!

Buy Choice or Prime Grade steaks for best results.

What temperature should steak be cooked to?

Whether you like your steak practically raw on the plate, or dry as a bone, this steak doneness chart should help you out. The chef’s standard level of doneness is medium-rare. At this point it  will be tender, juicy, and if you do it just right the steak will melt in your mouth. With practice you can tell how cooked a steak is just by feel alone. Every steak has a different cooking time due to varying thicknesses of the cuts. Be wary following anything that tells you a cooking time rather than a temperature. Use an instant read meat thermometer for the most accurate results.

What cut of steak should I use?

What cut of steak you make depends on what you like in a steak. There are 5 main steak options, each a little bit different in their texture and tenderness.

Porterhouse and T-Bone Steaks

What is it? Porterhouse and T-Bone steaks are similar cuts of beef that come from the short loin. These cuts both have a T-shaped bone in the middle and contain two different pieces of meat: tenderloin and strip steak. Porterhouse steaks are cut from the rear end of the short loin and contain a larger portion of the tenderloin, while T-Bone steaks are cut from the front end and contain a smaller portion of the tenderloin.

Why use it? This steak gives you two different steaks in one! One side is super meaty, the other tender. The bone in the middle keeps things cooking evenly.

Ribeye Steak

What is it? Ribeye is a beef steak that is cut from the rib area, between ribs six through twelve. It is a flavorful, marbled piece of beef that yields a very tender result when cooked hot and fast. You can buy both bone-in and boneless ribeye steak.

Why use it? The marbling of fat in this steak yields a melt-in-your-mouth steak when cooked correctly. The bone-in variety will help the steak cook more evenly. This is a fattier cut of steak that pickier eaters might not appreciate.

New York Strip Steak

What is it? New York Strip steak is a lean cut of beef from the short loin area. It is one side of the porterhouse or T-bone steak and is always served boneless.

Why use it? This is a lean cut of beef steak with little fat. It is an excellent choice for mass appeal.

Top Sirloin Steak

What is it? Top Sirloin comes from the back area continuing off the short loin area. Top sirloin has bones and the bottom round muscles removed.

Why use it? This is a less expensive cut of steak that can still yield a tender and flavorful result. This cut of steak is best suited for marinating and is a more budget conscious steak option.

Filet Mignon

What is it? Filet mignon comes from the small tip portion of the tenderloin.

Why use it? This is the most tender piece of beef steak and is still quite lean. It is a pricey option, but the resulting melt-in-your-mouth tenderness is unparalleled.

Read More : Grillhousecafesanmarcos.com

How to Cook Steak Perfectly Every Time

Bone-in vs Boneless Steaks

There is an endless debate amongst foodies about whether steaks are better bone-in or boneless, or whether or not it matters at all. Those who advocate for bone-in say that the flavorful marrow from the bone will seep into your meat while cooking, giving you a more flavorful result.

Bone-in DOES impact the cooking time of your steak. The bone changes the way the heat is distributed while cooking. It actually helps your steak cook more evenly and gives you a little more leeway with overcooking. Bone-in steaks will require a longer cooking time because the bone insulates the meat surrounding it. It takes a little more time for the heat to penetrate the interior, but once it does it spreads out evenly.

If you liked this recipe you may be interested in these other steak options, from beef to pork to seafood:

  • How to Grill Steak
  • How to Cook the Perfect Tomahawk Steak
  • Rachel’s Favorite Steak Seasoning
  • Perfect Grilled Pork Chops
  • Grilled Swordfish Steak

Instructions

  • Remove steaks from refrigerator and any packaging and let sit at room temperature for at least 30 minutes.
  • Rub each side with the olive oil to coat. Combine the salt, pepper, and white pepper in a small bowl. Rub both sides of each steak with the rub mixture.
  • Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Preheat a heavy, oven-safe skillet over high heat until it is smoking hot. Sear steaks in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes per side. If the steak has a side of fat, turn the steak onto its side and render the fat by searing it for 2-3 minutes as well.
  • Slide the skillet with the seared steaks in it into the oven to finish cooking. Remove the steaks from the oven 5 degrees before the desired level of doneness is achieved, or 130 degrees F for medium rare.
  • While the steaks are cooking, use a fork to combine the butter with garlic in a small bowl.
  • When the steaks are removed from the oven immediately top with 1 tablespoon of the butter mixture and allow the steaks to rest 10 minutes before cutting into them. The temperature of the steak will continue to rise as it rests by about 5 degrees.

Notes

Restaurant Basting Method:

Pat steaks dry. Do not add oil to the meat, but still season generously. Heat 2 tablespoons cooking oil in a large heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Add in steak and sear 2-3 minutes. Flip and sear an additional 30 seconds before adding in 4 tablespoons butter and any aromatics you want to use like rosemary, thyme, or smashed garlic cloves. Tip the pan and use a spoon to start basting the steak with the liquids as it cooks. Once the second side has had a chance to cook for 3 minutes, flip again and continue flipping every 1 minute, basting constantly, until the desired internal temperature is reached.

Reverse Sear:

Preheat your oven to 250 degrees Farhenheit. Place a wire rack onto a rimmed baking sheet. Season steaks as instructed in steps 1 and 2 and place onto the wire rack. Bake in the 250 degree oven until the internal temperature of the steaks reaches 10-15 degrees below your target temperature. Remove from the oven and sear in oil in a heavy skillet over high heat to form a deep golden brown crust.

Grilling Instructions:

Preheat an outdoor grill to high heat (about 500 degrees). Sear steaks for 3 minutes per side. Reduce the heat to medium-low and continue cooking with the lid closed until the steaks reach the desired level of doneness (130 degrees F for medium-rare). When the steaks are removed from the grill, immediately top with 1 tablespoon butter each, tent with aluminum foil, and allow the steaks to rest 5 to 10 minutes before cutting into them.

Nutrition

Calories: 475kcal | Carbohydrates: 1g | Protein: 50g | Fat: 28g | Saturated Fat: 12g | Cholesterol: 174mg | Sodium: 1387mg | Potassium: 800mg | Vitamin A: 350IU | Vitamin C: 0.5mg | Calcium: 50mg | Iron: 3.6mg